Sewanee Field Adventure Part 3: Fun on the Farm and the Beauty of Burning

On Friday, June fifth, the group visited the native plant garden, Cheston Farm and one of the burn sites on the campus. I had some fun working in the garden and seeing the pigs, cows, chickens and goats on the farm! We also got to see the difference between typical Cumberland Plateau forest with a dense understory and a site where oaks and Shortleaf and Virginia Pines were protected and the understory was burned. I saw a good number of new species since the last hike. Here are only the new species for the trip:

Birds (3 species, 0 lifers):

Northern Flicker

Eastern Bluebird

Turkey Vulture

Trees (12 species, 5 lifers):

Nuttall Oak

Black Walnut

Black Willow

*Slippery Elm

Pignut Hickory

*Hackberry

*Southern Crabapple

Blackgum

Northern Red Oak

Black Oak

*Winged Sumac

*Chickasaw Plum

Shrubs (1 species, 0 lifers):

Devil’s Walkingstick

Wildflowers (8 taxa, 4 lifers):

*Orange Daylily

Spiderwort

Coreopsis

Buttercups

*Showy Tick-Trefoil

*Purple Passionflower

Milkweed

*Bull Thistle

Ferns (1 species, 1 lifer):

*Royal Fern

Grasses (1 species, 1 lifer):

*Broadleaf Cattail

Vines (1 species, 0 lifers):

Woodland Strawberry

Aquatic Plants (1 genus, 1 lifer):

*Duckweed

Other Herbaceous Plants (1 species, 1 lifer):

*American Burnweed

Lepidoptera (2 species, 0 lifers):

Eastern Black Swallowtail

Monarch

Other Insects (1 family, 1 lifer):

*Wolf Spider

Reptiles (1 species, 0 lifers):

Eastern Box Turtle

Exotic Invasives (2 species, 1 lifer):

Mimosa

*Tree-of-Heaven

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Northern Flicker

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Southern Crabapple

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Broad-leaf Cattails

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Bull Thistle

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Broadleaf Milkweed

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Winged Sumac

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Duckweed

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Burnweed

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Water droplets hang to Eastern White Pine Needles

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Hackberry

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